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New Westminster Dentist

Knocked-Out Tooth (Avulsed Tooth)

Dentists refer to a knocked-out tooth as an "avulsed" tooth. This is one of the most serious dental emergencies for permanent teeth. However, the damage can be fixed. If you act quickly, there's a good chance the tooth can be saved. What You Can Do When a tooth has been knocked out, the nerves, blood vessels and supporting tissues are damaged, too. The nerves and blood vessels can't be repaired. That is why all avulsed teeth will need a root canal. However, the bone can reattach to the root of the tooth once it's put back into place. The odds ...
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New Westminster Dentist

Dental Scaling and Root Planing to Keep Your Teeth and Mouth Clean

You visit the dentist every six months for your dental check-up and professional cleaning, then one visit the dentist tells you that you have gum disease. Gum disease is inflammation of the gum tissue that could affect the teeth and supporting bone in your mouth. Plaque, bacteria, acids and certain foods all contribute to the development of gum disease. Fortunately, two common methods exist to reverse the disease — dental scaling and root planing. Dental scaling occurs with manual hand instruments, ultrasonic instruments or both. The dentist will start the procedure with a thorough examination of your mouth. Next, an ...
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New Westminster Dentist

What Is Tooth Enamel?

Have you ever wondered about tooth enamel? What is it? How important is it? How can you protect it? Here are the answers to all of your enamel questions. The enamel on your teeth is the hardest and most highly mineralized substance in your body. It covers the outer layer of each tooth and it is the most visible part of the tooth. The enamel is made up mostly of minerals, primarily hydroxyapatite. The color can vary from light yellow to a grayish white; since it is semi translucent, it is only partially responsible for the color of your teeth. ...
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New Westminster Dentist

Primary vs. Permanent Teeth: Understanding the Difference

Children begin losing their primary teeth around age 6 and should have 28 permanent teeth by age 13. Molars, commonly known as “six-year molars,” are the first permanent teeth to erupt in children, around age 6. Good oral care is important for primary and permanent teeth to build a lifelong routine so your child’s teeth last a lifetime. Your first grader came home from school bursting to share their newly discovered “loose tooth.” It’s definitely time to introduce the Tooth Fairy, but it’s also a good time to brush up on what this means for your child’s teeth. As your ...
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New Westminster Dentist

What All Patients Should Know About Dental X-Rays

Getting a dental X-ray is a normal part of routine dental exams at Brewery District Dental. Our dentists obtain them to detect dental disease (cavities or gum disease are simple examples) and to plan a course of treatment. We understand that you might have questions about what to expect during an X-ray, as well as concerns about radiation exposure. We would like to start by reassuring you that the amount of radiation your dentist uses in a typical X-ray is less than that used for airport screening, chest X-rays and other common scans. The Difference Between Intraoral and Extraoral X-rays ...
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