Cannabis & Dental Procedures

smoke it or use a vape, cannabis can negatively affect your dental procedures.

Talk to Your Dentist

Whether you consume cannabis for medical or recreational purposes, it is essential that you talk to your dentist about your use. Just like using alcohol or other drugs, if you consume it before dental procedures, it can negatively affect the outcome of your procedure. To ensure your safety during your appointment, be open and honest about your use. Some examples of its unintended effects are below:
  • Cannabis can increase the effects of IV and oral sedation. This is very important for those anxious patients who need a medication like Ativan to relax prior to dental appointments.
  •  Cannabis can increase bleeding time further for patients already taking medications that act as blood thinners (aspirin, anti-platelet drugs, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). These medications are common with patients who are at risk for stroke.
  •  It can also affect your sugar levels – this is noteworthy for diabetics that are taking medications meant to do the same thing.
It is essential that you avoid consuming cannabis products before a dental procedure, otherwise your dentist may need to reschedule your appointment for a later date. Whether you consume cannabis for medical or recreational purposes, it is essential that you talk to your dentist about your use. Just like using alcohol or other drugs, if you consume it before dental procedures, it can negatively affect the outcome of your procedure.

Impact of Cannabis on Oral Health

In general terms, cannabis has various effects on the mouth, such as:
  • Dry mouth (xerostomia) – whether it is smoked or ingested, cannabis reduces the amount of saliva produced in your mouth. Frequent users will notice this more readily, and evidence shows that dry mouth very commonly leads to a greater number of cavities.
  • Periodontal disease – the data is clear on the effects of cigarette smoking and gum disease, and research shows there’s a definite link with cannabis smoking as well. The effects of gum disease can be seen through red, puffy gums, and bone loss around your teeth.
  • Oral cancers – any time smoke is held in the mouth and lungs, there’s the possibility of heat damage to the tissue. It can also cause a change in the outermost lining of your mouth, which can be precancerous. Long term effects from these inflammatory changes may cause permanent destruction of the oral mucosa as well.
  •  Oral infections – cannabis users are also at higher risk for oral infections like thrush, stemming from the cannabis itself, but also from the dry mouth mentioned above.
It’s important to note that, in its various forms, the effects of cannabis vary greatly. When smoked or vaped, the effects come on rapidly and dissipate more quickly, compared to when it’s ingested. The effects of edibles take longer to appear, last for a longer time and are generally more unpredictable. If you’re a cannabis user with concerns about your oral health, just talk to your dentist. It’s a good idea to inform your dentist if you use cannabis, regardless of the frequency and amount. During a routine checkup, your dentist can screen for tooth decay, gum disease and oral cancer and can make suggestions on how to deal with dry mouth. Keep in mind that seeing your dentist promptly at the first sign of a potential problem can keep small problems from becoming a serious complication. To schedule your dental cleaning and exam, contact Brewery District Dental. Schedule your next dental cleaning. Contact us]]>